Knobelsdorff, Georg Wenzeslaus von

ARCHITECT (HOLY ROMAN EMPIRE)
BORN 17 Feb 1699, Kuckädel (near Krossen) - DIED 16 Sep 1753, Berlin
GRAVE LOCATION Berlin: Kirchhof Jerusalem und Neue Kirche I, Halleschen Tor, Kreuzberg (Abt. 1/1 56 (111-HW-5), Ehrengrab)

Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff was a soldier in the Prussian army before he resigned in 1729 to become an architect. Court painter Antoune Pesne taught him painting techniques and they became friends for the rest of their lives.

King Frederick of Prussia placed him in the circle of his son, hoping that Knobelsdorff would have a moderating influence on the prince.

In 1736 the prince enabled him to travel to Italy and after Friedrich became king in 1740 Knobelsdorff travelled to Paris and Flanders. After his return he was appointed head custodian of royal buildings.

In Berlin he created the Tiergarten and he constructed a new wing for Charlottenburg Palace. He started building Sanssouci in 1745 in Potsdam, but after he wanted to deviate from the kings design he was replaced by Johann Boumann, who completed the project in 1747.

Towards the end of his life he suffered from a serious liver disease. He wrote to the king from Spa in Belgium to thank him for everything and to allow his illegitimate daughts to become his heirs. The king agreed but they weren't allowed to inherit his title.

He died in 1753 and he was buried in the German Church on the Gendarmemarkt in Berlin. Four years later Pesne was buried beside him. When the church was rebuilt in 1881 his and Pesne's remains were transferred to the Kirchhof Jerusalem und Neue Kirche I in Berlin.

Related persons
• worked for Friedrich II der Grosse, König von Preussen
• was pupil to Pesne, Antoine

Sources
Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff - Wikipedia
Winkler Prins Encyclopedie (editie 1909), 1909
• Hammer, Klaus, Historische Friedhöfe & Grabmäler in Berlin, Stattbuch Verlag, Berlin, 1994

Images

The grave of G.W. Knobelsdorf and A. Pesne at the Kirchhof Jerusalem und Neue Kirche I, Halleschen Tor, Kreuzberg, Berlin. Both were moved here from the Deutsche Dom (Berlin) in 1881.
Picture by Androom (08 Apr 2003)

 


Knox, Robert

Published: 23 May 2010
Last update: 23 May 2010