Schumann, Julie

NOBLEMAN (GERMANY)
BORN 11 Mar 1845, Dresden - DIED 10 Nov 1872, Paris
GRAVE LOCATION Paris: Père Lachaise, Rue du Repos 16 (division 70)

Julie Schumann was the third daughter of Robert and Clara Schumann. She was a sweet but sickly child and she was considered the prettiest of the Schumann daughters. Johannes Brahms, a close friend of Clara after Robert's death, took a romantic interest in her. However, he didn't make this very clear and only dropped hints to Clara on the eve of Julie's wedding to count Vittorio Amadeo Radicati di Marmorito (b.1831).

Julie had met the count, a widower with two children, when she lived in southern countries because of her delicate health. The wedding took place on 22 Sep 1869 in Lichtenthal near Baden-Baden, where Clarea then resided. Brahms, allthough quite sorry, acted as her best man. Three years after the marriage she died in Paris of tuberculosis when she was pregnant with her third child. Her husband and two young sons Eduardo (1870-1877) and Roberto (b.1871) were left behind. Her married life had been short but happy, the count loved her and she was popular in Turin.

The news of her death reached Clara in Heidelberg on the afternoon of a contralto she would give with Amalie Joachim. She went ahead with it because it would have caused trouble to others if she had canceled it. She had inticipated Julie's death but it was still a blow to her. Julie was buried at Père Lachaise where her tomb can still be seen.

Family
• Father: Schumann, Robert Alexander
• Mother: Schumann, Clara Josephine

Related persons
• has a connection with Brahms, Johannes

Events
1869/9/22: Julie Schumann marries and Brahms loses another love
He was in love with Julie Schumann, the daughter of Robert and Clara Schumann. He dedicated a composition to her and hinted at 'settling in Vienna'. Nor mother neither daughter understood what he meant and Julie married and Italian count. On the evening of her marriage Brahms showed Clara his "Alto Rhapsody" and declared that this was his song for her engagement. It contained the text "Ach, wer heilet die Schmerzen" (who will heal the pain) and this was the first sign for Clara of Brahms' interest in Julie.

Sources
Time Table of History, Xïphias, 1992
Clara Schumann Chronology, Internet, 1996
• Gabrielli, Domenico, Dictionnaire Historique du Père-Lachaise, XVIIIe-XIXe siècles, Éditions de l'Amateur, Les, Paris, 2002
• Reich, Nancy B., Clara Schuman: The Artist and the Woman, Revised edition, 2001

Images

The grave of Julie Schumann at Père Lachaise, Paris.
Picture by Androom (24 Oct 2014)

 

The grave of Julie Schumann at Père Lachaise, Paris.
Picture by Androom (24 Oct 2014)

 


Schumann, Robert Alexander

Published: 26 Oct 2014
Last update: 27 Feb 2016